Tuesday, November 15, 2011

PLANETARY TREMORS: Unusual Geological Event in MultiCountries - RSOE EDIS Detects Activity in Caribbean Tectonic Subduction Zone?!

According to the following article, the Hungarian National Association of Radio Distress-Signalling and Infocommunications (RSOE) that operates the Emergency and Disaster Information Service (EDIS) has just issued a most alarming event report about the Caribbean.

Seven quakes have rocked Caribbean islands as of Saturday and another tremor occurred in Haiti this Monday, arising concern among experts about a likely seismic reactivation in the area. "For some days we have observed an unusual activity that seems to be linked to the subduction of the Caribbean tectonic plate," Saint Lucian seismologist Bruce Kleever told Prensa Latina. Seven tremors were felt in the British overseas territories in East Caribbean over the weekend, according to the Disaster Management Department of the Virgin Islands.

"The seisms were of 3.5-4.6 magnitude and could also be felt in Puerto Rico. WeaÖre following closely the situation in the area," said Kleever. A 4.3-magnitude quake rocked southern Haiti early morning today, one year, ten months and two days after the worst seism in the history of this country occurred. No damages or fatalities have been reported so far, but the people panicked as they relived the nightmare. According to the expert, the tremor might indicate an area of seismic activity also in the northern Caribbean plate. For years, the specialists have feared the likelihood of powerful quakes and ensuing tsunamis in the Caribbean because of the existence in the area of important focuses of danger of tectonic movement. One of them is located near Dominica, considered the point with the largest number of potentially active volcanoes in the world.

However, Kleever said panic must not be triggered among the population. "Just remain on alert and take steps in case of any tremor," he said. Steps include going to open, safer spaces, mainly in highlands, far from buildings. The Caribbean currently lacks a tsunami early warning system. Such a device would be likely available by year 2014. Watch over the area is carried out from the Hawaii-based Tsunami Warning Center, in the Pacific. At least 88 tsunamis have occurred in the Caribbean in the past 500 years, the worst of them in 1946, killing some 1,600 people. - RSOE EDIS.

PLANETARY TREMORS: Unusual Geological Event in MultiCountries - RSOE EDIS Detects Activity in Caribbean Tectonic Subduction Zone?!


According to the following article, the Hungarian National Association of Radio Distress-Signalling and Infocommunications (RSOE) that operates the Emergency and Disaster Information Service (EDIS) has just issued a most alarming event report about the Caribbean.

Seven quakes have rocked Caribbean islands as of Saturday and another tremor occurred in Haiti this Monday, arising concern among experts about a likely seismic reactivation in the area. "For some days we have observed an unusual activity that seems to be linked to the subduction of the Caribbean tectonic plate," Saint Lucian seismologist Bruce Kleever told Prensa Latina. Seven tremors were felt in the British overseas territories in East Caribbean over the weekend, according to the Disaster Management Department of the Virgin Islands.

"The seisms were of 3.5-4.6 magnitude and could also be felt in Puerto Rico. WeaÖre following closely the situation in the area," said Kleever. A 4.3-magnitude quake rocked southern Haiti early morning today, one year, ten months and two days after the worst seism in the history of this country occurred. No damages or fatalities have been reported so far, but the people panicked as they relived the nightmare. According to the expert, the tremor might indicate an area of seismic activity also in the northern Caribbean plate. For years, the specialists have feared the likelihood of powerful quakes and ensuing tsunamis in the Caribbean because of the existence in the area of important focuses of danger of tectonic movement. One of them is located near Dominica, considered the point with the largest number of potentially active volcanoes in the world.

However, Kleever said panic must not be triggered among the population. "Just remain on alert and take steps in case of any tremor," he said. Steps include going to open, safer spaces, mainly in highlands, far from buildings. The Caribbean currently lacks a tsunami early warning system. Such a device would be likely available by year 2014. Watch over the area is carried out from the Hawaii-based Tsunami Warning Center, in the Pacific. At least 88 tsunamis have occurred in the Caribbean in the past 500 years, the worst of them in 1946, killing some 1,600 people. - RSOE EDIS.


GLOBAL ALERT: Solar Watch - NOAA Warns of a Monster Solar Storm Facing Earth for Next 2 Weeks; Capable of Producing X-Class Flares!


Last Thursday the sun produced an X1.9 rated solar flare that narrowly missed Earth. Although it wasn’t aimed directly at us, about 45 minutes after leaving the sun it was still powerful enough to disrupt radio communications.

Now, that same area  responsible for producing the X-class flare may pose a direct threat to Earth. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Space Weather Prediction Center says that the region on the sun known as AR11339 and affectionately called the “Benevolent Monster” will set its sights on Earth. It will move into a position that poses the largest risk to our planet around November 9th, 2011 and remain on a direct line of sight with earth for the following two (2) weeks as it rotates:

Scientists at the federal Space Weather Prediction Center say that area is the most active part of the sun since 2005. It has dozens of sunspots, including one that is the size of 17 Earths. “It’s still growing. The size is what blows me away.” Thursday’s flare wasn’t aimed at Earth. However, this active region is now slowly turning toward Earth, and scientists say it will be directly facing Earth in about five days. That storm region will only affect Earth if it shoots off flares and they hit our planet, which doesn’t always happen with stormy areas, said prediction center space scientist Joe Kunches. The region will be facing Earth for about two weeks as it rotates, he said. Solar flares send out bursts of electromagnetic energy that can occasionally disrupt communications and electrical systems. - The Intel Hub.

We’ll be facing the monster starting sometime this evening into tomorrow. Considering that it has just recently ejected an X-class flare towards Earth and another towards Venus, we should consider the region to be active and fully capable of affecting our planet. While NOAA’s warnings fall short of any imminent ‘end of the world as we know it’ event, the risk over the next two weeks of a Carrington-like event are higher now than at anytime in the last decade. The 1859 Carrington Event, caused by a solar flare, reportedly knocked out telegraph operations around the world. It is believed that such an event, were it to occur today, could potentially take down the U.S. power grid for months or years and paralyze the entire globe:

Physicist Michio Kaku: It could paralyze the economy of the planet earth. In 1859 we had a gigantic solar storm which knocked out telegraph wires back then, 150 years ago. If that had happened today it would knock out almost all our satellites, knock out power stations, there would be food riots around the country because refrigeration would stop, airplanes would probably crash without radar... And again, this is a once in a century, once in two centuries storm... We do have them and we have to worry about them... We’d be thrown back 100 years...

Patrick Geryl of How to Survive 2012 contacted us recently and contributed a short video describing the potential fall out of such an event. The consequences would be devastating and would include everything from power grid failure and food shortages, to savage riots and, eventually, a meltdown of nuclear reactors across the globe. There would be very little warning, if any, with estimates suggesting that once a solar event is detected it could take anywhere from a few minutes to a couple of days to impact earth. - SHTF Plan
WATCH: The 2012 Solar Threat and a Worldwide Nuclear Meltdown.

WEATHER ANOMALIES: UK Trees' Fruit Ripening "18 Days Earlier"?!


"This caused me to go back and look at the data again to make sure it was valid because even I did not believe it initially."... "Anything that changes out of synchronicity is likely to cause disruption."


Britain's native trees are producing ripe fruit, on average, 18 days earlier than a decade ago, probably as a result of climatic shifts, a study reveals.

It shows that acorns are ripening 13 days earlier, while rowan berries are ready to eat nearly a month earlier. Experts warn that one consequence could be that animals' food reserves would become depleted earlier in the winter. The findings were published by Nature's Calendar, a data collection network co-ordinated by the Woodland Trust. "Some of the changes are really quite big and quite surprising," explained Tim Sparks, the trust's nature adviser. "This caused me to go back and look at the data again to make sure it was valid because even I did not believe it initially."

Prof Sparks said Nature's Calendar, formerly known as the UK Phenology Network, was established in 1998 to collect spring-time information. "But the gap in data was in the autumn So, since about 2000, the scheme has also been collecting data on things such as fruit ripening dates, leaf colour change and fall dates, and the last birds seen," he told BBC News. "We now have 10 years worth of data that can look at and identify changes. "In terms of looking at the fruit-ripening dates and the thing that came out was that they all seem to have steadily advanced over the past decade."

Prof Sparks, from Coventry University, observed: "Rowan was the big one as it seemed to have advanced by nearly a month over the course of a decade." He added that it was still uncertain what the ecological consequences of the advances would mean. "Anything that changes out of synchronicity is likely to cause disruption," he said. "What the actual consequences will be is slightly harder to work out. In this particular case, if all of this fruit is ripe earlier, and if all the mammals and birds are eating it earlier, what are they going to be feeding on during the rest of the winter? "In terms of feeding birds, you have big flocks of thrushes coming down from Scandinavia and feeding on berry crops in Britain, and they tend to do that after they have exhausted the supply of berries in Scandinavia. "You get these periods when hedges are being stripped bare, but the birds are going to have to do that earlier because that is when the fruit is ripe."

Although phenological records have shown that the arrival of spring is also advancing, Prof Sparks said it was "still a bit of a mystery" why the ripe-fruit dates had advanced over the past decade. He suggested: "There is a very strong correlation between these ripening dates and April temperatures, and that might be a result of flowering dates - it might just be that warmer springs result in earlier flowering dates, and subsequently result in earlier ripening. "But it might be a result of more sunshine; longer, warmer summers and therefore earlier ripening. "So the exact mechanisms really are still a bit of a mystery. We know it is happening, but we are uncertain why." Nature's Calendar is a web-based observations network and is a partnership between the Woodland Trust and the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology. To date, it has more than 60,000 registered recorders across the UK that observe signs of seasonal changes in the natural environment. The trust is calling on the public to plant a million native trees in gardens as part of its "Jubilee Woods" project. A spokesman said that the scheme would increase the abundance of food sources for birds and animals in future years. - BBC.

MONUMENTAL EARTH CHANGES: United Nations Scientists Forecast More Severe Droughts, Cyclones and Floods Across The Planet!


"If disasters occur more frequently and/or with greater magnitude, some local areas will become increasingly marginal as places to live or in which to maintain livelihoods."


Southern Europe will be gripped by fierce heatwaves, drought in North Africa will be more common, and small island states face ruinous storm surges from rising seas, a report by United Nations climate scientists says.

The assessment is the most comprehensive yet by the 194-nation Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change into the impact of climate change on extreme weather events. A 20-page draft ''summary for policymakers'' says that global warming will create weather on steroids, and that these amped-up events - cyclones, heatwaves, diluvian rains, drought - will hit the world unevenly. Subject to modification, the draft summary will be examined by governments at a six-day meeting of the panel starting today in the Ugandan capital Kampala. In the worst scenario, settlement in some areas could be wiped out, the report says. ''If disasters occur more frequently and/or with greater magnitude, some local areas will become increasingly marginal as places to live or in which to maintain livelihoods,'' it says.

''In such cases migration becomes permanent and could introduce new pressures in areas of relocation. For locations such as atolls, in some cases it is possible that many residents will have to relocate.'' The authors of the 800-page report express confidence in some findings but stress uncertainty in others, mainly due to lack of data. They also emphasise that the vulnerability of human settlements depends as much or more on exposure, preparedness and the capacity to respond as it does on the raw power of nature's violent outbursts. Average global temperatures have risen by nearly 1 degree since pre-industrial times, with forecasts for future warming ranging between an additional 1 to 5 degrees by 2100. But these worldwide figures mask strong regional differences. - SMH.

ANIMAL BEHAVIOR: MASS SUICIDE - 32 Pilot Whales Have Been Found Dead After Mass Strandings Off The South Island Of New Zealand?!


Thirty-two pilot whales
were confirmed dead today while the lives of 34 others hung in the balance after a mass stranding on tidal flats off New Zealand's South Island.

The remote location of the stranding meant rescuers were unable to help the marine mammals and their survival will depend on the tide, the Department of Conservation's area manager, John Mason, told the Nelson Mail. Mr Mason said the whales, up to five metres long, were stranded on the tidal flats at the tip of Farewell Spit in Golden Bay, located nearly three kilometres offshore at the northern end of South Island. "There's really nothing we can do for them so we just have to hope that they manage to get out by themselves," Mr Mason added.

The deaths of the mammals follow the stranding in Australia's island state of Tasmania over the weekend. Twenty-three sperm whales, up to 18 metres long, died after they became stuck on Ocean Beach, near Strahan, on Saturday. One of the whales died overnight on Monday, leaving the sole surviving whale stranded off a nearby sandbank at Fraser Flats. Rescuers had to abandon their attempts to refloat the final whale today due to wild weather, The Mercury reported.

"We were aware we had only a small weather window to work in today [Tuesday] and, as forecast, the strong winds and high seas have interrupted our attempts," incident controller Chris Arthur, from the Parks and Wildlife Service, said. He did not reveal any details as to when the rescue operation would resume. More than 1000 whales and dolphins have been stranded on Tasmanian beaches in the past 30 years, according to The Mercury. - News Australia.

MONUMENTAL EARTH CHANGES: Global Food Crisis - A Huge Drought Is Pushing Food Prices Even Higher, Causing Widespread Inflation!


A drought affecting one-third of the lower 48 states has hurt several key food crops, driving up prices this year and assuring widespread food inflation well into 2012. Several of these states have not had any significant rainfall since August. Winter wheat crops have failed. Ponds have dried up. Ranchers are spending heavily on hay and feed pellets to get their cattle through the winter. Some wonder if they will have to slaughter their herds come summer. Farmers say the soil is too dry for seeds to germinate and are considering not planting.

According to the National Climatic Data Center, the drought has caused more than $10 billion in losses to agriculture and cattle, a number it expects to keep rising as the drought continues. Meteorologists blame the drought on a La Niña weather pattern expected to last at least through the winter. Crops most affected include corn and peanuts. In addition, the lack of rain dried cattle grazing pastures to dust, which has translated to higher beef prices. "Yes, we are going to see higher prices this Thanksgiving," Purdue University agricultural economist Corinne Alexander told The Atlantic.

The American Farm Bureau estimates that a Thanksgiving meal for 10 will cost 13% more this year than it did last year. The U.S. economy already has inflationary pressure as a result of the stimulative policies of the U.S. Federal Reserve pumping it with hundreds of billions of dollars. "Ultra-low interest rates and excess money supply growth are what's been driving inflation," said Money Morning Global Investing Strategist Martin Hutchinson. "They raise commodity prices, which over time feeds into inflation in general." Now the drought is pushing food inflation higher than overall inflation. The Consumer Price Index (CPI) in September was up 3.9% over the previous year, while the increase for food alone was up 4.7%. Over the past five years, world food costs have risen 68%.

Earlier in the year, grocery stores were eating most of the price increases, somewhat insulating U.S. consumers. But in recent months that's begun to change. "The era of grocers holding the line on retail-food cost increases is basically over," John Anderson, a senior economist at the Farm Bureau in Washington, told Bloomberg News. Prices are going up the most dramatically in the categories of food most affected by the drought. Beef is up 10.1%, for instance. With pastures drying up over the summer, many ranchers were forced to sell off cattle before they could reproduce. While that briefly increased the supply of beef, the current shortage of cattle - the U.S. herd was at a 38-year low this summer - is impacting prices. The drought has caused the price of hay to skyrocket from $80 a ton to $200 a ton, which, because it's used as forage for farm animals, has contributed to a 10.2% spike in dairy prices.

But perhaps the hardest hit crop has been peanuts. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has projected a 13% drop in peanuts for 2011, which has caused the price for a ton of runner peanuts (used in peanut butter) to surge from $450 to $1,200 in the past year. That has led to massive price hikes among the major peanut butter makers. Kraft Foods Inc. (NYSE: KFT) raised the price for its Planters brand of peanut butter by 40% earlier this month, The J.M. Smucker Company (NYSE: SJM) raised the price of Jif by 30%, and ConAgra Foods Inc. (NYSE: CAG) raised the price of Peter Pan by 20%.

"This means drought is likely to continue in the drought-stricken states of Texas, Oklahoma and New Mexico," said Mike Halpert, deputy director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Climate Prediction Center. "The odds do not favor the south getting out of drought, at least before next spring or summer, and even that could be a reach." In Texas, which has by far borne the worst of the drought, government weather officials fear that the dry conditions could persist for a decade or longer. That's especially bad news for the cattle industry, as it takes three years to raise cattle to slaughtering size, and the herds were already severely reduced over the past summer. A years-long drought will further delay recovery and drive steep increases in beef prices. The only good news is that experts don't foresee any food shortages, just food inflation. "The food will be available; you're just going to pay a higher price," Purdue's Alexander said.
  - Business Insider.
Meanwhile monarch butterflies and weaker fliers are having a rough ride, due to drought and unusual weather.

Nourished by the most available nectars, bolstered by the most favorable genetics, the first butterflies of the annual monarch migration are filling the skies of their Mexican wintering grounds with flutters of orange and black. But it's not these that experts who study the monarchs' mysterious migration patterns are worried about — it's the less robust monarchs, most of them female, to follow. Every stage of the multigenerational life cycle has been off this year, and drought and atypical weather patterns are pushing the weakest through some of the harshest conditions on record. Central Texas, usually chief fattening grounds for the monarchs, has been bone-dry, so the flowering plants they need are hard to come by. Many monarchs have shifted west. Many are expected to die. “This might be the smallest overwintering population yet,” predicted director Chip Taylor of Monarch Watch, an organization dedicated to preserving the insects.

The monarch butterfly has long fascinated researchers and enthusiasts, who wonder how a fourth-generation insect finds its way back to the distinct patch of Mexican mountaintops that has for eons been the butterflies' wintering grounds. There, the monarchs go into a sort of cold storage, their wings blanketing the lower branches of their favored oyamel trees. “It's fantastic to see them coming in on a warm, sunny day,” said Lincoln Brower, a biologist at Virginia's Sweet Briar College who has been traveling to the oyamel forest for decades. “You look up at the sky and it's sparkling with beautiful orange monarchs with the sun coming through their wings. ... A gorgeous site.” Severe drought in the spring meant the breeding population returning from Mexico had a tough time finding nectar and milkweed, the only plant on which monarchs lay their eggs. Bred in the South, the new generation worked its way up the Great Lakes region, where a cold summer slowed subsequent breeding cycles. The monarchs that migrate south are the “great-grandchildren” of the last wintering population. The wintering populations have been declining, with the population two years ago the lowest in 16 years. That's partly because of arctic cold fronts reaching Central Mexico — a front in 2002 killed 75 percent of the wintering butterflies. - MySA.

EXTREME WEATHER: 125 mph Wind Storm Batters Southern Colorado!


“Man, what a lot of devastation,” said property owner Dwayne Roy... “I spent 27 years in the Navy, I was in a hurricane where the ship rolled 45 degrees, and I’ve been in a typhoon in the Philippines, and I’ve never seen winds like these,” Hislop said.


Powerful winds battered much of Southern Colorado over the weekend.


The worst of the storm hit overnight Saturday into Sunday. KRDO viewers reported damage in Custer, Fremont, and Las Animas County. Custer County Sheriff Fred Jobe tells KRDO NewsChannel 13 that two unofficial weather spotters who he deems reliable measured wind gusts of 115 mph and 125 mph respectively. In Custer County, 75 power poles were snapped, some sheds and barns were destroyed, and there were even reports of trees crashing down onto homes.

Tree damage is reportedly widespread across the county. Sheriff Job tells KRDO NewsChannel 13 that at one point, much of the county lost electricity. Most Blackhills Energy customers have since had their power restored. Some Sangre De Christo Electric Customers were still without power Sunday evening, including in the community of Rosita. Sheriff Job says that Sangre De Christo customers who do not have electricity yet may not have their service restored for several days. KRDO viewers also reported extensive damage in Stonewall, which is west of Trinidad in Las Animas County. - KRDO.
Winds estimated at above 100 mph tore through the gap in the Dakota Wall Saturday night, uprooting trees, shearing off roofs and knocking out electricity in this tiny Las Animas County burg. Several long-time residents said the windstorm was the worst they had seen in the area. “Man, what a lot of devastation,” said property owner Dwayne Roy. One minor injury was reported. A man hurt his leg when his motorhome rolled on its side, according to residents. The Picketwire store and lodge remained closed Sunday after gusts blew out the establishment’s sign, pushed the entire lodge building about 6 feet off its foundation and removed about half of the building’s roof. The entire western exterior wall of the lodge came down. Tree branches covered most of the lawns in the cluster of cabins and buildings adjacent to the Picketwire and some smaller utility buildings were left mangled and unrecognizable. The exposed root structure of a downed fir tree south of the general store measured around 8 feet tall...

Some Stonewall residents said Saturday night’s winds were the worst they have seen in their years living in the 149-year-old town. Homeowner Roy, worried for his safety and his home, left town at about 1:30 a.m. Sunday. He returned later in the morning to check his property and survey the damage. “I had a trailer tipped over right there and everything, but for the most part I was lucky,” Roy said. “I was lucky, but I thought the roof was coming off my house.” Roy said the Colorado Department of Transportation cleared the State Highway 12 of trees and branches following the massive bursts of wind. “It sounded like a train coming through here at times,” Roy said. “Some of the people I talked to this morning said 100, 110 (mph). All I know is I’ve been up here for 25 or 30 years and I’ve never seen wind like this. I think everybody’s pretty fortunate. Hislop, the United States Navy veteran whose garage, home and vehicles were damaged, compared the experience to weather phenomena he experienced at sea and abroad. “I spent 27 years in the Navy, I was in a hurricane where the ship rolled 45 degrees, and I’ve been in a typhoon in the Philippines, and I’ve never seen winds like these,” Hislop said. - The Trinidad Times.

MONUMENTAL EARTH CHANGES: WARNING - Round 2 of Winter Storm Hits Alaska, Record Snowfall Levels Have Been Reported in Juneau!


Record snowfall levels have been reported in Juneau, and more snow was to arrive this morning.

The National Weather Service issued a winter storm warning for Juneau and other parts of southeast Alaska until 5 a.m. today. Six to 10 inches of new snow are possible for Juneau, Petersburg and Wrangell, with slightly lesser amounts in places like Hoonah and Angoon. Juneau public schools were closed Monday. Eaglecrest Ski Area reminded outdoor enthusiasts it is closed and had no ski patrol or avalanche control onsite. Several city commission meetings were canceled, as was a lecture sponsored by the Sealaska Heritage Institute. City buses went on winter routes in areas where the city deems it unsafe to operate buses during heavy snow and ice.

Meteorologist Geri Swanson said Monday afternoon the 10.7 inches that had fallen at weather service offices since midnight broke a record for snow falling on Nov. 14. The previous record was 5.6 inches in 2006. The National Weather Service warned Juneau residents to prepare for a snowfall expected at 2 inches per hour with up to 10 inches of new snow. Juneau accumulated 15 inches of snow since the snow began falling Sunday night, according to the Juneau office’s snow measurements. The average snow depth in Juneau by 3 p.m. was 13 inches.

The storm warning was to last until 5 a.m. today. However, the NWS was scheduled to update its warning at 11 p.m. Monday, which is after the Empire’s press deadline. The weather service alert, issued around 3 p.m. Monday, warned the snow would be heavy with high water content, and could be difficult to manage. Motorists were warned to stay off the roads Monday night. “We have our crews at the ready,” said Alaska Electric Light & Power Co. spokeswoman Debbie Ferriera. So far Monday, AEL&P has only had one small outage in the Lena Loop area. Deputy Airport Manager Patricia deLaBruere said Juneau International Airport crews have been keeping the runway clear. She said the airlines have been having some issues with visibility. There was a flight this morning that did not get in, and another was delayed but deLaBruere didn’t know what caused the delay. “The airport has remained open,” she said. “Tomorrow we’ll know more with the forecast that’s out there.” - Juneau Empire.

MONUMENTAL EARTH CHANGES: Shocking Developments at El Hierro, Canary Islands - Toxic Gas, Pyroclastic Bubbles & Radioactive Waste?



There's a storm brewing off the coast of the El Hierro in the Canary Islands. In this case, it's coming from below the surface, an  underwater volcano. These eruptions aren't just a sight to behold—they're also unleashing toxic gases into the area. 
An underwater volcano near El Hierro in the Canary Islands has begun erupting near the shore, reports Reuters. The eruptions may be spectacular, but officials have also noticed that the volcano is spewing toxic gases into the air around the island. After a worker studying the volcano became ill, several of the island's beaches were closed. In the video, a local explains that the volcano is also making the island's cats act strangely and eat dead fish. The volcano, which is just over 200 feet from the surface, began erupting a week ago. The Daily Mail reports the eruption began with a 4.3-magnitude earthquake.

According to the International Business Times, the volcano is shooting magma 65 feet into the air. The eruption is the first in the Canaries since 1971 and locals are already speculating that it may create a new island. Despite the beach closures and dead fish near the island, the island's human population is safe. The Telegraph reports that Spanish authorities "insist there is no major risk for the population." - Huffington Post.
Scientists at the Institute of Technology and Renewable Energies (ITER), an agency of the Cabildo of Tenerife and now form part of volcanological Institute of the Canaries, have established that from July more diffuse flux measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2) in El Hierro through numerous scientific campaigns on diffuse volcanic gas emissions that have materialized over the entire surface of the island. To date, the results reflect the record of an upward trend of the emission of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere by the volcano of the coast of El Hierro has reached 1481 + / - 37 tonnes per day, an amount equivalent to 4.35 times the normal average value considered for the diffuse emission of CO2 for the island. - Lavanguardia.
In further confirmation of this, the following article details evidence of bubbles and smoldering pyroclastic at La Restinga.
After the calm of the last days, the bubbling has returned to the sea calms. On Monday also seen the smoke of the volcano expelling pyroclastic. Until 10:26 hours on Monday, the National Geographic Institute (IGN) has recorded 13 earthquakes. Most low power. Only one dated to 3.2 degrees 7:28:03 hours was felt by the population. According to a report Sunday by the IGN, "in the analysis of seismic data do not show evidence of a second source of tremor in the north." The rotten egg smell the fumes produced by the volcano comes to La Restinga, as confirmed from that location. On the other hand, the volcano monitoring network monitoring 24 hours of National Geographic Institute (IGN) has confirmed the direction of the Civil Protection Plan for Volcanic Risk Islands (PEVOLCA), which for this Sunday 16 earthquakes were located, two of which were felt by the population.

In a press note states that recorded the main event on Sunday was felt by the population, took place at 11:51 hours and reached a magnitude of 3.1 on the Richter scale. This earthquake is located at the NW of the town of Frontera, 2 km from the coast and 23 kilometers deep. The rest of the events recorded are located in the area of ​​the Gulf (municipality of Frontera), aligned NNW / SSE from the sea to the center of the island forming two distinct groups: the first between 15-17 km and the second between the 20-24 km. In total, since the day July 17, 2011 11 542 events have been found. Felt earthquakes were as follows: 05:39 pm, 23 km depth and magnitude 2.7; 10:51 hours, depth 23 km and magnitude 3.1. Moreover, the level of tremor with very few pulses of short duration (few minutes) on Sunday, without major changes in the amplitude of tremor in the background. In the analysis of seismic data do not show evidence of a second source of tremor in the north. As for the deformations, the monitoring stations in the east of the Gulf show stability on the island, except for a slight tendency towards the north of the station located in the Gulf HI03. In the vertical component there is still a phenomenon of deflation in the south of the island
. - Canarias 7. (Translated).

WATCH: Increases In Carbon Dioxide Emissions In Atmosphere. (Spanish Audio)


WATCH: Dumping Radioactive Waste at Sea.



NOTE: Special Thanks to Mary Greeley.