Tuesday, April 19, 2016

MONUMENTAL DELUGE: Major Storm Dumps Flood Of BIBLICAL PROPORTIONS On Houston, Texas - Over 20-INCHES OF Rainfall; At Least 5 Dead; Refrigerator Turns Into Boat; City Shuts Down; Many Homes Damaged; Thousands Of Water Rescues; Hundreds Of Flights Canceled Or Delayed; Storm System Also Dumped 50 INCHES OF SNOW In Pinecliffe, Colorado; Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner Called The Historic Event "UNPRECEDENTED"; Flash Flood EMERGENCY Still In Effect; Flooding Still Ongoing [PHOTOS + MAPS + VIDEOS]

This family escaped floodwaters in a refrigerator. David J. Phillip, AP

April 19, 2016 - TEXAS, UNITED STATES - Drenching rain, which brought flash floods to much of eastern and southern Texas on Sunday and Monday, deluged Houston, killing five and leading to scores of water rescues.

Harris County Judge Ed Emmett said two people died in a vehicle that ignored barricades at a freeway underpass. He said traffic cameras recorded the vehicle going around the blockade and head into the water. The vehicle didn’t make it through.

Two deaths reported earlier Monday included one man found inside a truck that that drove into high water on a freeway service road.

Harris County Precinct Sgt. Herbert Martinez says crews monitoring the high water on the road saw the man in the 18-wheeler truck drive directly into the water. He says it’s possible the driver may have suffered some kind of medical emergency.

Another man, identified only as a contractor working for the city’s airport system, also was found dead in a submerged vehicle not far from Houston Intercontinental Airport.

In Waller County, west of Houston, the Royal Independent School District confirmed Monday evening that teacher Charles Odum died in rising floodwaters.


Jose Romero, left, and a fellow resident make their way through floodwaters as they try to reach their flooded apartments on April 18, 2016, in Houston. 
David J. Phillip, AP

Residents are helped into the back of a truck as they leave their apartment complex surrounded by floodwaters in Houston.  David J. Phillip, AP

Residents of the Arbor Court apartments evacuate their flooded apartment complex in Woodlands a north suburb of Houston.   Brett Coomer, AP

Craig Baldwin picks up debris in his garage as he cleans up after his home was flooded in Woodlands, a north suburb of Houston.   Brett Coomer, AP

Edgar Peneda, of Roadway Construction, inspects a collapsed retention wall along eastbound U.S. Highway 290 in Houston.   Gary Coronado, AP

Residents of the Arbor Court apartments evacuate their flooded apartment complex in Woodlands, a north suburb of Houston.  Brett Coomer, AP

Alberto Lopez, right, helps his wife Glenda wade through floodwaters as they evacuate their flooded apartment complex April 18, 2016, in Houston.
David J. Phillip, AP

Residents use an air mattress to float on floodwaters as they evacuate their flooded apartment complex in Houston.   David J. Phillip, AP

Justin Nelzen, in red vest, joins others as they work to rescue up to 70 horses along Cypresswood Drive near Humble along Cypress Creek on April 18, 2016,
in Houston.  Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle, via AP

Felix Yanez, center, helps Lucy Olvio, right, and Judy wade through floodwaters as they evacuate from their flooded apartment complex in Houston. 
David J. Phillip, AP

Margarita Uribe, left, and her husband, Juan Juarez, wade through floodwaters as they evacuate their flooded apartment complex on April 18, 2016, in Houston. Storms
have dumped more than a foot of rain in the Houston area, flooding dozens of neighborhoods and forcing the closure of city offices and the suspension of public
transit.  David J. Phillip, AP

A resident looks out from the second floor as floodwaters surround his apartment complex on April 18, 2016, in Houston.  David J. Phillip, AP

As Greens Bayou starts to crest its banks, a man rescues an armadillo from floodwaters in Houston on April 18, 2016.  Steve Gonzales, Houston Chronicle, via AP

Darius Simon, second from left, helps his mother Carol, evacuate her flooded apartment complex along with his brother Dominique and son,
Isaac Hernandez, on April 18, 2016, in Houston.  David J. Phillip, AP

A man rides on the outside of a dump truck through floodwaters on April 18, 2016, in Houston.  David J. Phillip, AP

Jose Romero, left, and a fellow resident make their way through floodwaters as they try to reach their flooded apartments on April 18, 2016, in Houston. 
David J. Phillip, AP

Residents use an air mattress to evacuate an apartment complex surrounded by floodwaters Monday, April 18, 2016, in Houston. David J. Phillip, AP

Richard Lopez and Allie Hairford-Siemens hold the reins of three horses as they lead them from the back of truck through flood water along
Cypress Rosehill Rd. in Cypress, Texas on April 18, 2016. David J. Phillip, AP

Kaicee Crowley walks through floodwaters to get belongings out of her stranded car on April 18, 2016. David J. Phillip, AP

A resident carries her dog through floodwaters. David J. Phillip, AP

David J. Phillip, AP

Monday was one of the rainiest single days ever recorded in Houston, with nearly 10 inches of rain reported at the city's official weather observing location at the airport as of mid-afternoon.

Hundreds of homes and many major roads were flooded out in the Houston area, forcing schools, governments and businesses to close and causing power outages for thousands of residents.

Many areas reported over a foot of rain. One spot near Houston unofficially recorded as much as 20 inches.

Nearly 900 water rescues were performed in the city of Houston alone, and 1,222 total in the metro area, according to Harris County officials.

The National Weather Service called it a "historic rainfall event" for the region.

A flash flood emergency was in effect on Monday for the Houston area, and the weather service warned residents to stay off the roads.

The city opened several emergency shelters throughout the region, AccuWeather reported.

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner called the flooding "unprecedented" in the city. More than 100 water rescues were performed overnight, he said at a press conference Monday morning.

Seven bayous were over their banks in Houston, Turner said.

The weather service said flooding was ongoing and warned residents to stay out of the floodwater, noting the risk of drowning along with potential encounters with "chemicals, ants and snakes."

Parts of northwest Harris County and the nearby communities saw rates of 2 to 4 inches of rain per hour.

Hundreds of flights at both Houston airports were canceled or delayed.Several school districts and many government buildings in the Houston area were closed Monday.

The storms were part of a wide weather system that left warnings and watches through Tuesday morning for Austin, San Antonio, Dallas, Fort Worth, and as far east as Texarkana.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott says some taxpayers affected by severe rain and flooding will qualify for an extension to file their federal tax returns that were due at midnight.


 WATCH: Historic floods hit Houston.






Abbott said Monday that his office had been in contact with the IRS about pushing the tax filing deadline for those in areas inundated by heavy downpours. More than a foot of rain dumped on parts of Houston and knocked out power to thousands of residents.

The storms were from the same system that walloped the Rockies with heavy snow over the weekend, including more than 50 inches in Pinecliffe, Colo.

In Austin, flash flood watches and warnings were issued; some extend until Tuesday morning.The weather service issued flood watches and warnings for parts of North, Central and South Texas on Monday. Many areas could see 3 to 8 inches of rain; isolated pockets could get even more.In the Dallas-Fort Worth area, a flash flood watch remains in the area through Tuesday morning with rain continuing in the forecast through at least Wednesday into Thursday. Road closures have been reported and commuters are urged to exercise caution on roadways.

In Johnson County, south of Fort Worth, more than 30 road closures were reported.

There were also reports of voluntary evacuations underway in the community of Horseshoe Bend in Parker County, west of Fort Worth. - USA Today.





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